Alistair Smythe Works At Oscorp In The Amazing Spider-Man Game

By Kris . June 7, 2012 . 6:05pm

 

Dr. Otto Octavius isn’t the only genius employed at Oscorp in The Amazing Spider-Man—Alistair Smythe, inventor of the Spider Slayers, is part of their workforce, too, we discovered at E3 this afternoon.

 

Speculation about Smythe being included in The Amazing Spider-Man began when it was discovered that one of the collectible digital comics in the game is The Amazing Spider-Man Annual #19, which marked Smythe’s first appearance in the comics back in 1985. As it turns out, not only is Smythe part of The Amazing Spider-Man’s plot, he also has a very interesting role.

 

Before we get into that, here’s a quick recap of some of the other weird stuff that came out of Oscorp. As you already know, Dr. Curt Connors, who was also once employed at Oscorp like Octavius, turned himself into the lizard. Keen continue Connors’ research, Octavius created the Scorpion by injecting human DNA into a venomous scorpion, alongside with bits of black goo (likely the Venom symbiote) that Oscorp retrieved from one of their fallen satellites.

 

Oscorp also created the Rhino, who’s another of the animalistic bad guys in the game. It sounds like Octavius created him, too, but in this case he had help from—wait for it—a bio-chemist named Dr. Michael Morbius. Octavius blackmails Morbius into helping him, threatening him with the prospect of ending his career. Considering that the Vermin and the Iguana are also in The Amazing Spider-Man, this game is all about cross-species hybrid characters.

 

So, where does Smythe come in? We were told that Smythe is an up and coming scientist at Oscorp who builds the robots (see above trailer) that hunt cross-species hybrids like Spider-Man and the Rhino. Smythe designs the drones—and later Spider Slayers—as a means of preventing the chaos that hybrids like the Lizard caused.

 

It sure sounds like Oscorp is at the centre of a lot of trouble…


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  • cjeromek

    Looks like Ishaan was right about Smythe.

    I’m so excited for this game it’s not even funny. Now this is how you make a tie-in game. Instead of trying to cash in, you expand the universe. I also think most developers go wrong by not looking at the wealth of material available to thing when making adaptions. When you’ve got a character with 50 years of history to work with how can you not have a rich universe. For me as a cartoonist, the most exciting part  for me is developing the world that my characters exist in.

    • miguel.donayre21

      Very true my friend.Since I started viewing trailers about this game it has started to bring back memories of the spider-man game for the nintendo 64 and the tv show in 1994, good memories. I cant wait for this game to come out already 

    • http://www.siliconera.com/ Ishaan

      Yeah, it really does sound like they’re putting a lot of thought into this and trying to make it its own little universe, instead of just a couple of licensed games. I appreciate that very much. 

      As a matter of fact, I’d love to see them do an animated series set in the new movie universe. I think that could be very interesting. It’s been so long since we had a slightly more “grown up” Spider-Man cartoon. Ultimate Spider-Man (cartoon) looks terrible, frankly.

      • cjeromek

        Ultimate Spider-Man is worse than it looks. For all of Jeph Loeb’s talk about Marvel DNA it seems the only thing its good for is having every Marvel villain show up except Spider-Man villains. In 9 episodes, the only Spidey villain to show up is the over exposed Venom with short scenes of  Doc Ock looking menacing and having secret meetings with Norman Osborn. Peter and Nova are the biggest jerks around, Luke Cage has the personality of a paper bag, Iron Fist is a walking fortune cookie, and White Tiger’s just a straight up angry witch. All the staples of the comics are missing in favor of something that’s designed just for grade schoolers.

        This is a business model I will never understand. Sure it’s nice to get all the little kids but wouldn’t it also be nice to get the hardcore fanboys onboard as well. It’s not like it’s impossible. Just look at SpecSpidey; it was popular with the kids and the fanboys. Or look at the 90s show. For all its flaws it’s remembered fondly to this day.

        Marvel’s animation department is truly limiting themselves in terms of audience by just making cartoons that probably would have been better recieved in 80s. But this is 21st Century where it has been proven that character development and drama have a place in cartoons. Where long form storytellying can be utilized while still making every episode approachable. They’re thinking short term with these shows they have in development now when they should be thinking long term.

        • kazdamaz

          Just watched the first episode in the UK made me cringe…

        • http://www.siliconera.com/ Ishaan

          Ugh. That sounds horrid. I watched a trailer for it the other day, and saw all those horrendous merchandising tie-ins like the SHIELD bike he can ride and whatnot. Crazy. 

          When they first announced it, I was pretty happy because the Ultimate Spider-Man comics were great. Bendis has this really smart way of presenting down-to-earth characters and stories. Unfortunately, the cartoon doesn’t seem to reflect this at all. 

          I don’t know if I would just lay the blame on Marvel, though. The last few Batman cartoons have had that same problem, too. “The Batman” was full off the merchandising nonsense with none of the depth of what makes Batman stories good. And now, that new series with him and the ninja lady looks equally terrible.

          On the flip side, at least DC and WB try to do the special animated features for some of us older fans. I finally picked up Batman: Year One a few weeks ago and it was great. It’s a pity that there seems to be such a strong divide between the “kiddy audience” and the “older audience”. I don’t think people realize that, when we were kids, we liked stuff that was a little more mature. That’s why Batman: TAS and Batman Beyond were so popular.

          • Solomon_Kano

            The Batman… ugh. It’s a pity that show existed to begin with but now it’s being followed by another poor-looking Batman show. Ninja sidekick, and an Alfred that uses guns? Doesn’t really seem like DC knows why the old Batman cartoons worked so well, where their popularity stemmed from.

            The only thing DC’s got now that’s in the spirit of TAS and Beyond is Young Justice. Greg Weisman found that border that Bruce Timm hit with his shows, with it being appealing to kids with enough maturity to it for its appeal to skew a bit higher than them as well. Best show they’ve had since JLU ended. As always, their DC animated movies are great though. At least that hasn’t stopped.

      • Solomon_Kano

        It’s such a pity that Spectacular was ended for USM. From a great Spidey show to… that.

  • http://www.facebook.com/people/Dylan-Ng/100000854638739 Dylan Ng

    This sounds like……..

    ……..a BEAR-ly big mess of animals.

  • Rohan Viajar

    that looks like…
    a Reaper? O_o   (0:57)

  • Solomon_Kano

    Morbius blackmailed by Otto into helping him? Smythe making Oscorp robots? This story is getting interesting. Usually that’s the worst part in Spider-Man movie games, but this is sounding interesting.

  • PoweredByHentai

    O_O

    *goes to pick up jaw from floor*

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