Wii

Fishing Master World Tour: Angling Around The World

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The original Fishing Master was a wonderful and fun game, that you would think would be difficult to improve on. And yet, Fishing Master World Tour does improve on the original title and provide a more fulfilling, colorful and addictive virtual fishing experience. Not only that, but is also a wonderful multiplayer sport game that easily hooks players.

 

The original Fishing Master was a wonderful and fun game, that you would think would be difficult to improve on. And yet, Fishing Master World Tour does improve on the original title and provide a more fulfilling, colorful and addictive virtual fishing experience. Not only that, but is also a wonderful multiplayer sport game that easily hooks players. The only disappointment in the title stems from the lackluster online experience.

 

The premise of Fishing Master World Tour is fairly simple and familiar, especially if you played the original Fishing Master. Once again, you’re out to become a master fisherman, except this time being the best fisherperson in Japan isn’t enough, you want to be world renowned. That means you have to travel to various locations and try to catch every possible fish you can, while also fulfilling certain quests to catch certain fish and taking on various other masters to prove you’re better than they are.

 

I absolutely loved the controls. If you want to be realistic, you can go through the motions of fishing to, well, fish. If you’re tired of motion controls and just want to relax and play, do you can do so. It’s wonderfully adaptable and comfortable, just like the original game.

 

The points system is also altered slightly so it is easier to get into a groove and start earning points to purchase fishing equipment and bait. It only took me three days in-game to get enough money for a better pole and a decent supply of special bait.

 

I also found that it was much easier to catch certain bait-specific fish and the special fish than it was in the original Fishing Master. In Fishing Master World Tour I found it wouldn’t be as difficult to lure a special fish. Plus, the special fish were easier to identify. Here, they glow and really stand out, as opposed to the red shadow in the original.

 

In the original Fishing Master, I’d have trouble sometimes catching fish which required specific bait. Instead of the target fish, I’d often catch fish that could be caught with the unlimited supply of lugworms or earthworms and waste my more expensive bait. Here, there isn’t a guarantee that you’ll catch the target fish, but I noticed that if I purchased five of a special bait, the fish that would hit on that kind of bait would appear at least two of the five times.

 

Speaking of fish, the number you can catch has pretty much doubled. The original Fishing Master only had around 100 different fish, and Fishing Master World Tour has over 200. It adds quite a bit of replay value to the game, as well as making things much more interesting.

 

It also looks quite good. The characters look a bit more refined and realistic in this outing than they did in the previous Fishing Master, but still have a comical and whimsical look to them. The environments look more realistic as well, which is a nice touch since you’re really paying more attention to the environments than the characters.

 

I also liked that the on-screen cues and images were clarified in Fishing Master World Tour. The scale that appears at the top of the screen once a fish is on the line clearly shows a meter telling you how the fight’s going, and how close you are to either having the fish escape or break the line. When you need to wave the remote left or right while fighing a fish, a clear remote image appears on the either the right or left side of the screen and moves, letting you know you better fling the remote in that direction if you want a fish. Also, as I mentioned earlier, it is much easier to see and identify special fish.

 

The multiplayer is also vastly improved. The home multiplayer mode is nearly identical to the method found in the original Fishing Master. You set terms for your battle against one to three other people in the room, and then try to get the most points.

 

The WiFi aspect is a lie though. When I first saw the Nintendo WiFi Connection logo, I was excited and positive that it meant I would get to fish and compete against other players around the world. Well… technically that’s true. You get to register your score in the story mode of the game. That score gets sent to an online leaderboard to see who’s earned the most points. You can register your game data on the National and Area Leaderboards, and then view your ranking online or in the game (provided you’ve ranked high enough).

 

I was pretty pleased to see that I was #5 in Illinois when I registered my data for Illinois after playing for a few hours. Of course, there are only seven people on the Illinois leaderboard so far, so I guess that isn’t that striking an accomplishment.

 

Despite the lackluster online aspect to Fishing Master World Tour, it really is a wonderful game. It is definitely an improvement and comprehensive followup to the original Fishing Master, with more to do and see. If you’re looking for a Wii fishing game, Fishing Master World Tour won’t let you down. It certainly kept me entertained.

 

Images courtesy of Hudson.

Jenni Lada
Jenni is Editor-in-Chief at Siliconera and has been playing games since getting access to her parents' Intellivision as a toddler. She continues to play on every possible platform and loves all of the systems she owns. (These include a PS4, Switch, Xbox One, WonderSwan Color and even a Vectrex!) You may have also seen her work at GamerTell, Cheat Code Central, Michibiku and PlayStation LifeStyle.