AnimeNews

New Netflix Detective Conan Anime Stars Culprit Hanzawa

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Netflix Detective Conan the Culprit Hanzawa

Netflix will host a new anime series based on the famed Detective Conan franchise. Called Detective Conan: The Culprit Hanzawa, the series adapts a comedy spin-off manga that appeared in 2017. The new Netflix Detective Conan show was announced for a February 1, 2023 premiere via the official Netflix Anime social media accounts. The spin-off was first revealed in November 2021, and it is being produced by TMS entertainment.

Netflix also uploaded a Detective Conan: The Culprit Hanzawa trailer to YouTube.

The Netflix Detective Conan spin-off will star “Hanzawa”, a featureless villain dressed in full-body black tights and with a mind for murder. Hanzawa originated as a visual gag from the Detective Conan series. Whenever the various crimes solved in the different cases were depicted in flashback, the villain, their identity unrevealed, would be represented by an all-black figure, regardless of their actual identity. This became something of a running joke for the series, and over time this “character” was given a name “Hanzawa” (a pun on “hanzaisha” or “perpetrator”). In 2017 a comedic manga launched, illustrated and written by Mayuko Kanba, working off the premise that Hanzawa is an actual person, “Makoto Hanzawa”. In the anime, Hanzawa will be voiced by Shota Aoi. Aoi also voiced characters like Rosado in Fire Emblem Engage, Louis Kisaragi in King of Prism, and Ai Mikaze in Uta no Prince-sama.

The visual language of a silhouetted villain in flashback was adopted by other mystery series, including games like Danganronpa.

Netflix also uploaded a poster for the show, featuring Hanzawa, Conan himself, and other characters from the main show.

Detective Conan: The Culprit Hanzawa will appear on Netflix on February 1, 2023.

Josh Tolentino
Josh Tolentino is Senior Staff Writer at Siliconera. He previously helped run Japanator, prior to its merger with Siliconera. He's also got bylines at Destructoid, GameCritics, The Escapist, and far too many posts on Twitter.