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Street Fighter II Pocky Comes with a Custom Fighting Game

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Street Fighter II Pocky

Glico is going a step further for its crossover event with Capcom. From November 29, 2022, the companies will bring a classic fighting game together with a classic snack. The result: Street Fighter II Pocky. [Thanks, Dengeki!]

The Street Fighter II Pocky promo mainly involves specially decorated packages of chocolate-flavor Pocky. Pocky is the classic Japanese snack consisting of flavor-coated biscuit sticks, sold in Japan and around the world since 1966. The special “Pocky KO” limited edition packages feature the character sprites from the game on the box and snack wrappers.

The other key aspect to the promotion is a special PC and mobile-based edition of Street Fighter II itself. Called Street Fighter II Pocky Edition, the web-based game can be accessed by entering a code included in the Pocky KO packages into the campaign site. Rather than standard SFII, the Pocky Edition adjusts the game graphics to be more Pocky-like. For example, the health bar is replaced with a “Pocky chocolate-to-pretzel ratio.” There’s also a special “Pocky KO” rule where players have to defeat their opponents once their health hits the right chocolate-to-pretzel ratio of coating on a Pocky stick. Victory screens and poses have also been modified to feature Pocky. The game supports single-player play as well as online multiplayer play.

Glico also teased the creation of a physical arcade cabinet to house Street Fighter II Pocky Edition, though the details will be published on the campaign site when the promotion launches.

This also isn’t the first time Pocky hooked up with Street Fighter. In 2019, Glico and Capcom launched the Pocky K.O. Challenge Campaign ahead of the 2019 Capcom Cup, though it used Street Fighter V. This was where the the “Pocky Ratio” rule was debuted.

The Street Fighter II Pocky promotion launches in Japan on November 29, 2022.

Josh Tolentino
Josh Tolentino is Senior Staff Writer at Siliconera. He previously helped run Japanator, prior to its merger with Siliconera. He's also got bylines at Destructoid, GameCritics, The Escapist, and far too many posts on Twitter.