Video game retailers get a passing grade

    0

    A new mystery shopper study done by the Federal Trade Commission shows an increase in retailer enforcement of the ESRB (Entertainment Software Review Board) ratings labeled on games. The study was done with children between 13-17 years old over a period of four months (10/05-01/06) across 406 stores in 43 states. Only 42% of the kids were able to purchase an “M” rated game without a parent, this is down from 69% in the last study done in 2003. Fifty percent of the clerks/cashiers asked the child’s age, double compared to 2003. Also 44% of stores had information about the rating system somewhere in clear view, this is up from 27% from 2003. Since the year 2000, when the study was first conducted, there have been slight increases year after year. However, 2005 showed a huge jump in retailers that adhered to the ESRB guidelines.

     

    Full study details below.

    Amount of mystery shoppers able to buy a M-rated video game.
    2000 – 85%

    2001 – 78%

    2003 – 69%

    2005 – 42%

     

    Did the electronic game store provide information about ratings or enforcement?

    2000 – 12%

    2001 – 26%

    2003 – 27%

    2005 – 44%

     

    Did the cashier/clerk as the child’s age?

    2000 – 15%

    2001 – 21%

    2003 – 24%

    2005 – 50%

     

    2005 results compared between national and regional/local retailers.

     

    Able to buy an M-Rated Game

    National – 35%

    Regional – 63%

     

    Information posted about ratings

    National – 51%

    Regional – 23%

     

    Asked their age

    National – 55%

    Regional – 35%

     

      0
      Siliconera Staff
      Sometimes we'll publish a story as a group. You'll find collaborative stories and some housekeeping announcements under this mysterious camel.

      You may also like