Why Didn’t I Hear About The Tomorrow Children Before PlayStation Experience?

By Jenni . December 9, 2014 . 4:01pm

The system is breaking down, people. When you hear about really nifty games, you’re supposed to tell me. Shout at me on Twitter, send up a smoke signal, or something. Don’t put me in a situation where I don’t know a unique game like The Tomorrow Children exists until I see it at an event!

 

Unless, perhaps you don’t know about it either? It’s a plausible scenario, as Q-Games and Japan Studio’s PS4 game hasn’t gotten a lot of widespread attention. I mean, aside from its Gamescom 2014 announcement, it’s been shadowy and mysterious.

 

I was drawn into the game by its unique look. All of the characters are clones of humans. The real humans are gone. They’re sealed away, sleeping in matryoshka dolls, and it’s up to these puppet clones to work together to recover them and restore towns. The figures are haunting ones, eerie dolls that mechanically roam about towns.

 

Given their goal of restoring humanity and mechanical nature, it’s a perfect fit for the use of Czech imagery and Communist propaganda. Characters are urged to work for the good of their specific town, traveling to islands to mine resources. It’s dangerous work, as venturing into darkness can cause the unknown to attack. Lights are needed, and working together is advised for the greater good. Indeed, community was even stressed in this early, alpha build on display at PSX. I constantly saw other The Tomorrow Children players, but only when they were also performing actions. Otherwise, they were invisible. If I did see one, though, I could contribute to the work, adding to my own prowess as well as gaining resources for the greater good.

 

Not that there were any humans to save in this demo. It was too early for that. Or any opportunity to really start upgrading the specific town I had spawned in and “joined.” Instead, I found myself first diving into work breaking down a monster that had attacked the this town earlier.

 

Yes, there are monster attacks. Judging by the remains I saw, they’re huge beasts. When one comes, the clones can build towers to defend the area and defeat it. The defeated creature becomes a shell of its former self, which can be mined. It’s an intriguing system.

 

The Tomorrow Children triggered my imagination. There were a few classes available in the demo, like civilian and miner, but the only changes so early on were the ability to get a few extra stat points here and there. Some tools were available to make mining easier. Still, I have a feeling there’s potential here. Especially since players will be able to work together to make their town a home. Though, if someone wants, I did learn it will be possible to migrate to other towns either for business, pleasure, or to find a new permanent residence.

 

I suppose the best thing to say is that I’m hopeful. The Tomorrow Children seems like a game that is taking inspiration from a title like Minecraft, rather than flat out copying it like many other clones we’ve seen appear. The notion of working with a community to recover and rebuild towns, surrounded by such unique trappings, makes me want to investigate more and see what the future of this dystopian game could look like.


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  • Godmars

    Missed during the E3 presentation?

    • I must have, yeah. Sometimes, so many things get announced that it’s easy for things to be overlooked.

      • SobriK

        Gamescom. This one wasn’t announced at E3 :P

  • Rafael Monteiro

    It was on TGS, but has soon as “free to play” and “social game” is mentioned, everyone lose interest

  • Seth Rich

    I love almost everything about it, but it has that stigma that other games like Evolve and Splatoon have, where it would be much more exciting if it was focused on the single player aspect. I love Tomorrow Children’s slick yet ghostly presentation, but when I think about all those social aspects to the game and the mining, I just go “Ehhhh.” I’m struggling to care. I love the world and that villain they showed in the trailer and I like Q Games (Starfox Command was great) but in the end I just don’t think I’m the audience for this game.

  • Eddie Dominguez

    communist garbage! i think that stalin,mao and pol pot would have loved this “piece” there were many victims of communism to try to make this pass as of cute and trendy

  • It’s interesting reading completely different news sites, because a few other places I visit, this game has had fairly wide coverage (as it’s been at GDC, E3, and TGS). I’d imagine the fact that Giant Bomb did a quick look put it on a few more gamer’s radars as well.
    I’m cautiously optimistic, personally. A friend of mine is playing it and feels the same — there’s a lot of “bare bones” that are the frameworks of good ideas, but they’ll have to be implemented well to pull in the diverse crowds they’re looking for.

    • True. One has to remember that this is only an alpha. I’m sure it’ll be more robust come launch. :D

    • Ultima-X

      Everything might as well, feel the same under the same controller. Tell him to actually explain himself.

      • I think you misread what I said. SHE feels the same as I do, cautiously optimistic that the game will fill out and be great.

  • ThatGuy3190_7

    If it isn’t an MMORPG shooter, a generic shooter (or any shooter) or The Last of Us, then it will most likely not be noticed. With that said, this looks very interesting to play.

    • DaiRaiOh

      So I’m going to presume you haven’t been around for the last few years

      • ThatGuy3190_7

        And I’m going to presume that you’re being a condescending jerk with that statement. Of course I’ve realized that for more than a few years now, otherwise I wouldn’t have said it or would have worded it in a question. I was making a true statement, not a realization.

        • DaiRaiOh

          Except it’s not true. The last few years have proven as much.

          • ThatGuy3190_7

            The last few years has not proven as much. Look at the games that are being released and are obtaining heavy recognition. Now, a title like Danganronpa 2…that is a a title that deserves to be in a GOTY category. Sadly, it’s not because it’s on the Vita, a handheld that supposedly does not have many games, and it does not have online play nor does it have free roaming or guns. Games like Destiny, it’s nothing but a rehash of Call of Duty but painted and decorated on a new canvas.

          • DaiRaiOh

            I look at those games and see games like Journey which last I checked, is not a shooter. You’re letting your blatant fanboyism take priority over logic and letting it give you a nice case of tunnelvision. Congrats on that.

          • ThatGuy3190_7

            I’m not even fanboying over anything. I’m aware of indie games like Journey, Shovel Knight, The Binding of Isaac, etc. I gave Journey a try, and it did not impress me in terms of gameplay. I know that the creators were going for an artful approach, and I do appreciate art and anything artistic. Shovel Knight is a game on which nostalgia is heavily implied and aimed for. I appreciate my childhood but I don’t look towards it in every single game.

            Take a look at the PS4 and Xbox One and look how many shooters are on there compared to racing, platformers, and fighters.

            The reason I said Danganronpa 2 deserves more recognition than it already receives is because of its story, gameplay, character and story development, soundtrack, and its uniqueness. Now take a look at Destiny or a game that’s on PS4 or Xbox One and identify what sets it apart from the others. Oh, but don’t worry, I’m being a “fanboy”, right? I’m a “fanboy” because I’ve noticed that a majority of the games that are heavily recognized are practically the same or are striving for art and not other areas that goes into a game, right? By the way, I never said I strictly supported one console, one company, or one genre of gaming, which falls into the category of fanboy. So…how about that tunnel vision, huh?

          • DaiRaiOh

            Or you could just be overly defensive and presumptuous. I guess that works too.

          • ThatGuy3190_7

            You called me out of my name and not expect me to defend myself? I gave valid reasons for my statement yet you still turn them down. Do you want me to lie and say that I’m a “fanboy” just for your sake because that ain’t happening. After all, I noticed you didn’t defend your statement, and you did reply to my original post in a manner that can be taken as condescending towards someone. If you don’t have anything nice or contributive to say to someone, then don’t say it at all or else it will cause unnecessary problems.

          • DaiRaiOh

            “you called me out of my name” What? And something being taken as condescending doesn’t really mean anything. If one takes something as whatever way they chose to, it doesn’t instantly make it vaild. But anyway, continue to be your own problem here. That sort of thing tends to do people well.

          • ThatGuy3190_7

            You called me a fanboy, something that I am not. You replied to my original comment with “So I’m going to presume you haven’t been around for the last few years”, which is condescending and arrogant, maybe not to you but it is towards me. It is arrogant and condescending because you are presuming that I do not have any knowledge of video games over the past few years. I am not the problem here. It is your arrogance and your name calling or labeling that is the issue here. I’m not going to sit here and be labeled for something that I am not. I’m also not going to sit here and continue argue with someone who started an issue. So take your presumptuous views and go jerk off somewhere in your self-imposed glory.

          • Mr_SP

            So, Assassin’s Creed is a shooter? Metal Gear Solid is a shooter? (And, yes, I know it has shooter features, but that wasn’t exactly super-effective on anything more difficult than “easy” in past games.) Elder Scrolls? Telltale games? inFamous? Shadow of Mordor? Dragon Age? The Witcher?

            Yes, shooters (and shooter-like, eg GTA) are the most popular genre, with a huge chunk of the market share. But other games do get noticed. Indies don’t get noticed because they don’t have much in the way of PR, and they’re just sort of hoping someone with a large Twitter following notices them.

          • ThatGuy3190_7

            Gee, and here I thought those who comment on this would use their imagination and expand on the thought and not focus on the aspect of shooters or misinterpret that I think all games are shooters.

            I’m well aware that Assassin’s Creed is not a shooter. However, it is very similar to Prince of Persia, Thief, Infamous, the Batman Arkham games. I am well aware that Metal Gear Solid was not once considered a shooter, but it is very similar to Splinter Cell games. Shadow of Mordor is similar to Elder Scrolls, Skyrim, Dragon Age, Oblivion. The point I’m trying to make is that the most recognized games plays and feels like other popular games. The only thing that sets them apart is the story (if there is a story), and perhaps character(s).

            I do admit that I am still uncertain if indie games are still in that phase where they focus more on art (and the player’s creation of) in their games. I’m not saying that I think video games aren’t art. I do think that it is art, but that it should not focus strictly on the aspect of design and graphics and should utilize story, character, and music to the best of the creator’s ability in a way that will not box itself in. In other words, games should be something that sets itself apart from others, not mirror the most popular game at the time. Games that do not mirror another game doesn’t receive as much recognition as it deserves.

          • Mr_SP

            Then why did you say that, rather than what you “meant to say” but did not even hint at!? If you don’t say what you mean clearly, then do not be surprised that people interpret the things that you say, rather than the things you did not say.

            Of course all popular new games are similar to popular old games. People can’t create whole new genres of art out of nothing, so why would you think that someone could pull out a completely original concept every time they make something?

            Indies cling to whatever uniqueness they can manage, not because that’s the goal, but because it’s the only option available. They avoid being shooters, because there are far too many shooters. But they’re not original. This game is doing little, if anything, that has not been done before. It’s doll-like looks have been done in Stacking, though that game was far more original about it. It’s gameplay is strikingly similar to things like Harvest Moon, or Atelier, Story of Seasons, or that one game on the 3DS where you could be an alchemist or a blacksmith, except now it’s online and community based.

            This isn’t Katamari Damacy, or Noby Noby Boy, or Catherine. (And even that is a little like Jenga.) It’s a bit different, but it’s not incomparable to a multitude of already-existing works. It is far too late to magically come up with something complete new – everyone else has already done that. That’s not what should be focused on. Journey never did anything that hasn’t been done before, (Walking? Done. Desert? Done. Anonymous online interaction? Yep.) but it did it in a way that came together wonderfully, and created passionate experiences. Unique gameplay is not the be-all and end-all of things.

          • ThatGuy3190_7

            I didn’t want to deliberately hand out the answer, I wanted commenters to expand their mind, their thinking, not to narrow in on one thing and consider me unintelligent.

            I know all popular games mimic old games and take some aspects from it, but the fact that the popular games today take aspects from games that aren’t even that old is a bit disappointing. Like, we’ve seen it a year or two ago, so what makes us think we haven’t forgotten about that game? What sets it Assassin’s Creed apart from Prince of Persia? It isn’t impossible to make something original, but challenging? Definitely.

            Like I touched upon on a lengthy comment, I know that gameplay isn’t everything. What makes a game unique or stand out are its themes, character(s), story, interaction, soundtrack, and distinctive art. Shooters, for examples, often have their main characters as someone who is gruff and tough. It’s been done so many times. Yawn. Why not present a female main character in a shooter? Why not bring a fleshed out backstory to the main character and characters involved with the story, a reason for their personality and a reason for their cause and what they hope to achieve from it? Maybe there is a handful of shooters or MMOs that are like that. I’d like to think that Halo fits somewhere in that category but I haven’t played anything past Halo 1 as I don’t own an Xbox and I don’t plan on owning one anytime soon because of the majority of the games it offers are not really up my alley aside from Allen Wake and Tales of Vesperia (and I don’t want to own a console for only a handful of games that interests me). I am also aware of games reusing old elements from other games to make it unforgettable. Heck, almost half of the games in my collection does that.

          • Mr_SP

            I am annoyed by your rambling, and constantly changing arguments. You don’t get people to think by making simple, inaccurate, statements, then changing those statements the first time someone points out how narrow minded and incomplete they are. Clearly, there is no intelligent discussion to be found here.

          • ThatGuy3190_7

            And clearly you didn’t fully understand my reply. But you’re right. I can’t get people to think unless I spoon feed them a direct answer to get them to think in order to prove me wrong. As far as changing my statement, nothing changed actually. I just provided further proof. There is no narrow mindedness here. So, in an effort to spoon feed everybody the answer, allow me to correct my original statement.

            If it isn’t an MMORPG, a generic shooter (or any shooter), The Last of Us, a game like Assassin’s Creed, or any AAA then it will most likely not be noticed. With that said, this looks very interesting to play. The reason is because it is not the same as other popular titles. I’m well aware that Assassin’s Creed is not a shooter. However, it is very similar to Prince of Persia, Thief, Infamous, the Batman Arkham games. I am well aware that Metal Gear Solid was not once considered a shooter, but it is very similar to Splinter Cell games. Shadow of Mordor is similar to Elder Scrolls, Skyrim, Dragon Age, Oblivion. The point I’m trying to make is that the most recognized games plays and feels like other popular games. The only thing that sets apart popular games from each other is the story (if there is a story), and perhaps character(s).

            However,what makes a game unique or stand out are its themes, character(s), story, interaction, soundtrack, and distinctive art. Shooters, for examples, often have their main characters as someone who is gruff and tough. It’s been done so many times. Yawn. Why not present a female main character in a shooter? Why not bring a fleshed out backstory to the main character and characters involved with the story, a reason for their personality and a reason for their cause and what they hope to achieve from it? Maybe there is a handful of shooters or MMOs that are like that. I’d like to think that Halo fits somewhere in that category but I haven’t played anything past Halo 1 as I don’t own an Xbox and I don’t plan on owning one anytime soon because of the majority of the games it offers are not really up my alley aside from Allen Wake and Tales of Vesperia (and I don’t want to own a console for only a handful of games that interests me). I am also aware of games reusing old elements from other games to make it unforgettable. Heck, almost half of the games in my collection does that.

          • Mr_SP

            Clearly, you are uninformed. To start with, Shadow of Mordor is more like the Arkham games than Assassin’s Creed is. Elder Scrolls, Skyrim, and Oblivion are *literally* the same thing – Skyrim is the sequel to Oblivion, and they are both Elder Scrolls titles. For many of those games, saying that they are similar is using *very* broad strokes. Dragon Age, Shadow of Mordor, and Elder Scrolls are far more similar in their settings and themes than they are in their gameplay.

            “What makes a game unique or stand out is it’s themes, characters, setting, story, interaction, soundtrack, and distinctive art.” So, basically what makes a game unique is everything it does? Of course, you’re missing two: Setting and Mechanics. That’s everything that goes into a game, and, yes, they are also important to making a game unique. If not for the Nemesis system, Shadow of Mordor would not have been a noteworthy game, for example. It’s setting – Middle-Earth – is also vital to it’s success. Assassin’s Creed’s setting is also vital, more than any of it’s characters or themes.

            “If it isn’t an MMORPG, a generic shooter (or any shooter), The Last of
            Us, a game like Assassin’s Creed, or any AAA then it will most likely
            not be noticed.”
            Again, you completely miss the mark. Only one of those elements is important: if it isn’t a AAA title, it will most likely not be noticed. If a game can pretend that it’s good by using AAA PR budgets to convince the media and consumers and make highly impressive CG trailers, then it’s going to sell more than a very polished game with a smaller PR budget, solely because it abuses social interaction to generate a pre-popularity that makes getting the game important to players. The actual genre isn’t often that important.

            “Why not present a female main character in a shooter?” Metroid Prime. Perfect Dark. Left For Dead.

            “Why not bring a fleshed out backstory to the main character and
            characters involved with the story, a reason for their personality and a
            reason for their cause and what they hope to achieve from it?” Halo, Bioshock, FEAR, The Darkness…

            Flawed examples, tautologies, unoriginal suggestions… What do you think you’re giving anyone to think about? Research and think things through before you try to present your argument as new and innovative.

          • ThatGuy3190_7

            I also mentioned in one of my replies about Halo, about how I would vouch for Halo but I’ve only played the first game as I do not own an Xbox nor do I plan on getting one because of the limited amount of games that interests me on that platform. I am familiar with Metroid Prime and Perfect Dark series, which is why I omitted them and focused solely on games that were released in the past 3 or 4 years. If it isn’t a AAA game, then it will most likely be noticed? Huh, I don’t seem to hear any mention of Danganronpa 2 after its release. Not a AAA game but was barely mentioned before and after its release. I do admit that I do not know much of Elder Scrolls and Skyrim and that they are related to each other, mostly because I cannot get into Middle-Earth-like genres (we all have different tastes, and Middle-Earth things bore me for the most part). And obviously I omitted some things of what makes a game because I’m trying my best not to make an essay out of this (it’s currently finals week and I’ve had to write more than enough essays than I can shake a hand at), and the fact that most games of its genres tend to rehash. I’m just tired of seeing the same type of games being made over and over: games like Destiny, Killzone, Titan Fall, games like Assassin’s Creed, games like Call of Duty, etc. because I’m not going to give out a whole list of games that are identical to each other in some way, that isn’t to say that I think Assassin’s Creed is similar to the games I just listed because I know they aren’t.

            I also failed to mention which games I’ve played but it’s rather a lengthy list (I’ve been playing video games since the early 90s. The Sega Genesis was my first console).

    • darke

      Apparently you’ve never heard of Minecraft, or the army of clones it’s spawned. I’m told it’s a fun game. Microsoft thought it was worth two billion dollars.

      Also survival games are a big thing as well, some of them don’t even have guns in them!

      That you didn’t notice the recent Assassin’s Creed debacle (not shooter or MMO), or the DriveClub/The Crew (neither are shooters, though The Crew is MMO-like) fuss speaks wonders of how little you pay attention to gaming, and how much tunnel vision you have.

      If you’re only seeing MMO/generic shooters, or The Last of Us, it’s because you’re only looking at them.

      • ThatGuy3190_7

        I have heard of Minecraft, the recent Assassin’s Creed debacle, Drive Club/The Crew, etc. I’ve already made a lengthy reply to someone who made a similar comment. I wasn’t focusing solely on shooters and MMO. I was speaking of popular games in general. And I do notice MMO/generic shooters but I show no interests in them. I play every genre of games as long as it’s not so similar to another type of game of its genre. Puzzle adventure games, RPG games (Persona series, Shin Megami Tensei series, Tales series), Fighters (Blazblue, Guilty Gear, Smash Bros.), whatever genre there is, most likely I play them or have played them. I stray away from shooters because they all look the same now. Older shooters like Outtrigger and Time Splinters are different from today’s shooters, and I enjoy that.

  • chocodino

    ignorance is the only answer to the tittle question

  • SobriK

    So, this is a pretty well-written article on the whole… but the headline style feels remarkably out of place (and a bit too mainstream/Gawker-y…) for Siliconera.

    Also, how could the author have missed a major PS4 title announced at Gamescom – which is arguably becoming a larger show for reveals than E3? I know we’re all human, but I’m pretty sure everyone from Giant Bomb to Polygon covered that one when it broke in August.

    Maybe it was just the editorial way to bring The Tomorrow Children onto Siliconera 3 months after the announcement? I don’t know, and I should probably be in bed.

    Anyway, it’s a nicely written hands-on all the same! :)

  • brian

    I thought we knew anything from Q-games would obviously be good, because they have a consistently great track record.
    Pixel Junk, in particular.

  • Chim_era

    This game was covered 2 months age in a local game magazine and I thought exactly the same: “Why haven’t I picked this up!?!”
    But I also found No Man’s Sky pretty late, with so many games coming out lately it is becoming pretty crowdy ;)

  • It had an alpha last month which I played a bunch of. Unless they’ve removed things from the game since then, or for some reason were showing an older build, this article contains a lot of factual errors.

  • Ben

    I was in the alpha and hugely disappointed. I turned it off after about an hour and never came back. It felt pointless and directionless and did nothing to hold my interest. It’s a shame too because I had been excited about after the teaser earlier this year.

    • PSIN4MANT

      You know that Alpha gameplay, complete and indicative of the final product.

      • Ben

        Queue snarky douchebag comment. Thanks for your input.

  • PSIN4MANT

    Cause you weren’t paying attention? The game was announced at Gamescom

  • Axe99

    Game deffo looks interesting. Been aware of it since launch, but author may travel in different circles?

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