Elaborating on Every Extend Extra

By Spencer . October 9, 2006 . 1:56pm

Linda Jo, one of the producers from Buena Vista Games, takes sometime to talk about Every Extend Extra for the PSP. Every Extend Extra is one the titles designed by Tetsuya Mizuguchi’s studio Q Entertainment. She gives us details on the combo system, the skinny on localization and a clue about a bonus in the BVG release.

 

Siliconera: Why did BVG decide to pick up Every Extend Extra for a North American release?

Linda: When we first met with Q Entertainment regarding Every Extend Extra and Lumines II, we were extremely interested in publishing both games.  Every Extend Extra is a totally unique game and seems perfect for the PSP system.

 

Every Extend Extra begun as the freeware game, Every Extend, what’s “extra” in the PSP game?

Every Extend Extra takes the original Every Extend game that was created by a Japanese student and adds tons of elements to create an original game.  We’ve added new music, sounds, graphics and gameplay elements but kept the fun, engaging, addictive gameplay from the original PC freeware game.  We’ve also included a version of that freeware game, Every Extend, so it will be playable for the first time on the PSP system.

 

How would you describe the game and the chaining system?

The game is a puzzle shooter that requires you to control your reticule and detonate it to create the largest combos.  You have to avoid objects to stay in the game but create these combinations by detonating when the most objects are around – creating a chain effect.  There are nine stages and multiple boss battles with unique visuals and music. 

 

Do you have any tips to get large chains?

You have to figure out your strategy to stay alive, gather quickens (objects which speed up the motion of the objects) and then detonate at the right time.  It takes practice but we’ve already heard of lots of people who became addicted and ended up finishing the game.

 

How does multiplayer work out in Every Extend Extra?

For Every Extend Extra’s multiplayer mode, like the single player mode, you detonate your reticule to create combos – but by doing so, you push a large sphere from the top of your screen that will float into your opponent’s screen.

 

What is your favorite “drive” and song in E3?

Each of the levels is pretty unique and distinct.  If I have to pick a favorite, it might be Nostalgic Drive.  It’s the drive that draws me in the experience most comprehensively.

 

Editor’s note: Nostalgic drive (pictured below) is my favorite drive too. You’re in this dark arena illuminated by carnival lights. When your ship explodes you make a wave of fireworks and the boss battle is against a giant merry go round. The music for this drive is a relaxing house track with tribal vocals.

 

Will there be any new music or changes to the North American release?

We’ve got all the features of Every Extend Extra in the version Buena Vista Games is publishing for all territories except Asia.  Plus, one of the bonus drives in the game includes an original music track that is exclusive to the version published by BVG. 

 

What was the most difficult task in localizing Every Extend Extra?

Translating or not translating the terms (Boss, Drive and ranking names) from the development team’s creative naming was difficult.  There were quirky and subjective choices made in the naming and choice of terms that were not readily translated into English, French, Italian, German and Spanish because part of the ‘logic’ was a ‘sense’ more so than defined meanings.

 

Are there any plans of a PS2 port of the game, similar to Lumines Plus?

We don’t have any plans at this time.  We’re focused on bringing this game to the PSP system November 7 in the U.S.

 

A new song? Sounds like I’ll have to unlock all the drives in the North American release too. Read up our import coverage on Every Extend Extra and look forward to domestic coverage next month when the game is released here.


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  • http://thegamespoilers.com PrincessPeach

    The PSP version looks a lot more colorful than the freeware PC version. I hope they keep the same music style as the freeware version, since it matched the graphics perfectly.

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