AnimeNews

Minami-ke Music Appears on Spotify and Apple Music

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Minami-ke Music

The boss is back. Japanese record company King Records has announced that music from Minami-ke is now available to listen to via select streaming services. These include Spotify, Apple Music, YouTube Music, and Amazon Music. The announcement comes as King Records has lifted streaming restrictions on a number of back-catalog albums and singles [Thanks, Famitsu!].

The Minami-ke music collection now on streaming services encompasses six soundtracks released over the course of the show’s broadcast life between 2008 and 2013. These include various singles and mini-albums, and even “insert songs,” which are songs that play during a single episode (rather than as an opening, ending, or character theme). Collectively these additions cover over 75 songs, including

Here’s a list of Minami-ke music albums appearing on streamers:

  • Minami-ke Biyori (1st season OST)
  • Haru-Ka-Aki Toujou! (Character Song Mini-Album from Minami-ke Okaeri)
  • Minami-ke Character Song Best Album
  • Shiwase☆High Tension↑↑ (Minami-ke Tadaima OST 1)
  • Kyusekkin Lucky Days (Minami-ke Tadaima OST 2)
  • Minami-ke no Mina Uta (Minami-ke Tadaima Character Song Album)

Based on the manga series by Kohaku Sakuraba, Minami-ke is a slice-of-life series that follows the three sisters of the Minami family: Haruka, Kana, and Chiaki. The three study in high school, junior high, and elementary school, respectively. Precocious and headstrong, the sisters are constantly getting into various escapades alongside their friends and classmates. The anime ran for three seasons on TV from 2007 through 2009, with several further direct-to-video OVA projects produced through 2013. A fourth TV season, Minami-ke Tadaima, aired in 2013, as well.

Minami-ke music albums are available on a variety of streaming services, including Spotify, Apple Music, and YouTube Music. The series itself can be streamed in North America via Funimation.

Josh Tolentino
Josh Tolentino is Senior Staff Writer at Siliconera. He previously helped run Japanator, prior to its merger with Siliconera. He's also got bylines at Destructoid, GameCritics, The Escapist, and far too many posts on Twitter.